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"Let us reason together…" Isaiah 1:18

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Becoming People of Realized Potential: Honoring Mother and Father

The honoring of mother and father precedes, is necessary for and included in realizing one’s fullest potential in Christ.

 

For this presentation we are looking at each of us as the child of our mother and father.

 

Although you may or may not be a mother or father, you are definitely the child of your mother and father.

 

What happens in my heart and through my hands in my relationship with my mother?

 

First and foremost, honor is to be in my heart and lived out through my hands to my mother.

 

  • Honor is a decision and not a response.
  • Honor is truthful and not fake.
  • Honor is system-wide and not compartmentalized.

 

Let us consider honor through the lens of Deuteronomy 5:6-22.

 

We know, based upon Deuteronomy 5:22, God wrote the Ten Commandments on two tablets.

 

Then he wrote them on two stone tablets and gave them to me. Deuteronomy 5:22

 

We don’t know which directives were on which tablet, but almost everyone agrees that on the first tablet God wrote guidance for relationship with Him and on the second tablet He wrote guidance for people’s relationship with each  other.

 

In some ways all ten commandments are about honor.

 

Most students of the Bible see the Ten Commandments written as follows:

 

Table One Table Two
Honor God – No other gods before Him Honor your father and mother
Do not make graven images and worship them Do not murder
Do not take the Lord’s name in vain Do not commit adultery
Remember the sabbath and keep it holy Do not steal
  Do not bear false witness
  Do not covet

 

The Hebrew word God selected for honor in Deuteronomy 5 carries the meaning of recognizing and giving proper weightiness.

 

Table One teaches us to recognize and give proper weightiness to God.

 

Table Two teaches us to recognize and give proper weightiness to God by recognizing and giving proper weightiness to mother and father.

 

Upon what authority do we make the opening claim of today’s message?

 

“The honoring of mother and father precedes, is necessary for and included in realizing one’s fullest potential in Christ.”

 

The fifth commandment makes it very clear that life being lengthy and going well is directly connected to honoring father and mother.

 

16 “‘Honor your father and your mother, as the Lord your God commanded you, that your days may be long, and that it may go well with you in the land that the Lord your God is giving you. Deuteronomy 5:16

 

This commandment might be stated a different way.  “Honor your father and mother, as the Lord your God commanded you, or your days may be shortened, and it may not go well with you in the land that the Lord your God is giving you.”

 

Historically it seems the opposite of honor is not dis-honor, but shame.

 

This commandment might now be stated in even another way, “Shame your father and mother, in opposition to what the Lord your God commanded you, and your days will be shortened and it will not go well with you in the land that the Lord your God is giving you.”

With none of us being exempt from the shameful, we equally stand in shame before God.

 

The cross was the most shameful death in the history of the world.  Crosses weren’t designed primarily to kill.  Crosses were intentionally prepared to bring great humiliation and shame to the crucified.

 

Jesus died shamefully on Calvary’s cross.

 

“looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.”  Hebrews 12:2

 

Good News Alert!  Good News Alert!  Good News Alert!

 

There never was, is or will be something shameful about Jesus.  He is shameless and perfect in every way.

 

Jesus took my shame and destroyed it on the cross.

 

Jesus took my shame and gave me His honor on the cross.

 

With my shame gone and His honor now mine, I am free to honor every human being by recognizing and giving them proper weightiness.

 

My Dearest Mother,

 

You are designed by God.  I honor you.

You were created by God.  I honor you.

You gave me life.  I honor you.

Mom, I honor you.

 

According to Psalm 8: 4b-5 you are created by God and in His image and He “crowned you with glory and honor.”

 

what is man that you are mindful of him,
and the son of man that you care for him?

Yet you have made him a little lower than the heavenly beings[b]
and crowned him with glory and honor.

MCA Church LIFE GROUP Homework

Listen – My Story

  • Do you have a favorite memory of your mother that sharing with the group today will honor her?
  • What is your favorite thing you have done to honor your mother?

 

Learn – Digging Deeper

  • Please read Deuteronomy 5:6-22. Which of the first four commandments are growth areas for you, MCA Church and our nation?  Which commandment is the easiest for you to obey consistently?
  • How important do you see these commandments for your personal honoring of God?
  • Which of the final six commandments are growth areas for you, MCA Church and our nation?
  • How important do you see these commandments for your personal honoring of your mother and father?
  • What are your favorite ways you honor God?

 

Lift – Prayer

  • How would you like your Life Group to pray for you today?
  • Is there someone you have difficulty honoring? Please pray for God’s grace to help you grow.
  • Are you still carrying shame that Jesus took from you long ago? Pray to experience His honor.
  • Please pray for your mother.

 

 

Life – Taking it Home

  • What is the Holy Spirit asking you to add, delete or recalibrate in your life?
  • Is there something you should do ASAP to honor your mother?
Posted on 11th May 2019 in Mother, Weekend Talks  •  Comments are off for this post
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30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World: The Kazakhs

The Kazakhs people are both an ethnic group and a nation.  Most Kazakhs live in Kazakhstan, the world’s largest land-locked country.

Though traditionally referring only to ethnic Kazakhs, including those living in China, Russia, Turkey, Uzbekistan and other neighbouring countries, the term “Kazakh” is increasingly being used to refer to any inhabitant of Kazakhstan, including non-Kazakhs.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazakhstan

We pray for the growing number of Kazakhs Christians to be strengthened in faith, empowered in ministry and united in relationships.

Posted on 11th May 2019 in Uncategorized  •  Comments are off for this post
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30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World: The Rohingya of Malaysia

The Rohingya people, refugees from Myanmar, are identified by the United Nations as one of the most persecuted minorities in the world.  Additionally, the United Nations has stated the Rohingya are victims of ethnic cleansing.  It is unbelievable such atrocities exist in our world of today.  Lord, have mercy.

May God take bold action on behalf of these beloved people for whom justice, generosity and civility has been denied.

 

Posted on 10th May 2019 in 30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World  •  Comments are off for this post
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30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World: Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bosnia and Herzegovina would be blessed by a giant dose of God’s reconciling love.  Following extreme difficulties in 1990, many people there are polarized in cultural/religious groups.  Muslims, Catholics and Orthodox have deep roots and there is plenty of room for misunderstanding.

Let us pray for the gracious gift of God’s love to rule in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Jesus is Lord in Bosnia and Herzegovina!

Posted on 10th May 2019 in 30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World, Uncategorized  •  Comments are off for this post
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30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World: Mali

I have an affinity with the men of Mali.  Every day they gather around a cup of tea.  :0)

Today my prayer is for the Good News of Jesus to be shared in thousands of tea gatherings in Mali and for many to respond by placing their trust in Jesus for salvation.

Jesus is Lord in Mali!

Posted on 8th May 2019 in 30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World  •  Comments are off for this post
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Psalms: Introduction to Psalm 1

Last session we learned to consider the ebb and flow of our lives through three movements.

 

“Our life of faith consists in moving with God in terms of:

  1. Being securely oriented;
  2. Being painfully disoriented; and
  3. Being surprisingly reoriented.”

Praying the Psalms, Walter Brueggemann, page 2

Being securely oriented Being painfully disoriented Being surprisingly reoriented
Psalms of Praise Psalms of Protest Psalms of Thanksgiving
Psalm 145 Psalm 22 Psalm 103

 

Psalms 1 and 2 are the gateway into all of the Psalter.

 

Similarly to preparing for entrance into the Tabernacle of Moses one “prepares” to enter the Psalter.

 

Leviticus 16

 

“This is how Aaron is to enter the Most Holy Place: He must first bring a young bull for a sin offering and a ram for a burnt offering. He is to put on the sacred linen tunic, with linen undergarments next to his body; he is to tie the linen sash around him and put on the linen turban. These are sacred garments; so he must bathe himself with water before he puts them on. From the Israelite community he is to take two male goats for a sin offering and a ram for a burnt offering.

 

Exodus 28

 

Send for your brother Aaron and his sons Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar. They are the ones I have chosen from Israel to serve as my priests. Make Aaron some beautiful clothes that are worthy of a high priest. Aaron is to be dedicated as my high priest, and his clothes must be made only by persons who possess skills that I have given them. Here are the items that need to be made: a breastpiece, a priestly vest, a robe, an embroidered shirt, a turban, and a sash. These sacred clothes are to be made for your brother Aaron and his sons who will be my priests. Only gold and fine linen, woven with blue, purple, and red wool, are to be used for making these clothes.

 

Bruce Waltke, noted Psalms scholar, teaches that Psalm 1 is preparation for “entrance into the Psalms.”  Additionally, he names Psalm 1 as the “Wicket Gate to the Psalter.” http://biblicalelearning.org/old-testament/psalms-2/

 

In this perspective, Psalm 1 and 2 are the necessary preparation for entrance into the Psalter.

Book One

The Way of the Righteous and the Wicked

Blessed is the man
who walks not in the counsel of the wicked,
nor stands in the way of sinners,
nor sits in the seat of scoffers;
but his delight is in the law of the Lord,
and on his law he meditates day and night.

He is like a tree
planted by streams of water
that yields its fruit in its season,
and its leaf does not wither.
In all that he does, he prospers.
The wicked are not so,
but are like chaff that the wind drives away.

Therefore the wicked will not stand in the judgment,
nor sinners in the congregation of the righteous;
for the Lord knows the way of the righteous,
but the way of the wicked will perish.

The Psalter addresses one of the most dominant themes of all God’s communication and relationship with humanity:  righteousness and wickedness.

 

In essence, the Judeo/Christian life is exceptionally simple.  There is only one decision required, “Will I chose the way of the righteous or the wicked?”  Psalm 1:6, 2:12, John 14:6

 

This simple choice flows harmoniously throughout God’s relationship with humanity.  From Genesis to Revelation the call is for righteousness.

 

We find righteousness in the ministry of Jesus, the writings of the Gospels, Peter and Paul.

 

  • Matthew 25:31-46
  • Luke 23:47
  • 1 Peter 4:18
  • Romans 3:21-26

 

What will follow Psalm 1 and 2 are the words of those the Psalter identifies as righteous.

 

But now in the canon of scripture these prayers have a common theological setting in the Psalter: they are the words of those the Psalter identifies as saddiq, “righteous,” setting them apart from those called “wicked.” These prayers of the righteous provide a window into the Psalter’s understanding of the righteous and their relationship with God. They allow the reader to gain a purchase on what it means to be righteous, how the saddiq speaks out of his or her need to God and how such a person imagines God to be and to act.  Jerome F. D. Creach. The Destiny of the Righteous in the Psalms (Kindle Locations 308-311). Kindle Edition.

 

Jerome Creach shows how numerically dominant the theme of righteousness and wickedness are in the Psalms.

 

The term “righteous” (saddiq; plural saddigam) and related words such as “upright” (yasar), “poor” “oppressed” (dal) and “needy” (‘ebyon) appear a combined 125 times in the Psalms, thus drawing frequent attention to the subject. Furthermore, the term “wicked” (rasa ; plural resa`im), which signifies those who oppress and persecute the righteous, appears so often (82 times in the Psalter) that the reader is constantly confronted with the concern for how life will turn out for the righteous. Jerome F. D. Creach. The Destiny of the Righteous in the Psalms (Kindle Locations 2319-2321). Kindle Edition.

 

Bruce Waltke forms the expansiveness of righteousness and wickedness into a simple and complex, easy to remember saying:

 

  • The righteous are those who disadvantage themselves for others.
  • The wicked disadvantage others for themselves.

http://biblicalelearning.org/old-testament/psalms-2/

 

Jerome Creach presents a summation of righteousness from the Psalter.

 

The righteous person’s relationship with God

 

  • The righteous depend on God for protection.
  • The righteous plead to God for forgiveness.
  • The righteous worship God in humility.

 

The righteous person’s relationship with others

 

  • The righteous love and serve their neighbors
  • The righteous person’s faith in God and obedience to him are inseparable.
  • The righteous have clean hands and a pure heart.

 

“…the destiny of the righteous is a central organizing subject that provides a fruitful entree into the Psalter as a whole.”  Jerome F. D. Creach. The Destiny of the Righteous in the Psalms (Kindle Locations 2316-2317). Kindle Edition.

As we pursue the life of faith that is “moving with God” in seasons of orientation, disorientation and reorientation, may what is said of Jesus be said of us.

“Surely this was a righteous man” (Lk. 23:47, NIV). Luke’s account of Jesus’ death includes this surprising statement from the Gentile centurion beneath the cross. What prompted the soldier’s assessment ofJesus, no one knows. One possible explanation is that Jesus immediately before death called out to God in prayer using the words of Psalm 31:5, “Father, into your hand I commit my spirit.” Whatever the reason for the centurion’s words, Jesus, at the moment of his death, does appear as one of the righteous, praying in the midst of suffering, just as the ones in the Psalms.  Jerome F. D. Creach. The Destiny of the Righteous in the Psalms (Kindle Locations 304-307). Kindle Edition.

 

 

Posted on 8th May 2019 in Psalms  •  Comments are off for this post
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30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World: Egypt

Even a casual reading of the Bible and other historical documents reveals extended tension between the work of God in the world and the land of Egypt.  Today, the difficulties continue.

With nearly 100 million citizens, Egypt’s Christian potential is remarkable.  The Coptic Church there shares the Light of the World in the face of various forms of persecution and sometimes with the cost of their lives.  Yet they are faithful even unto death.

May the Light of Jesus Christ dispel the deep darkness.

 

Posted on 7th May 2019 in 30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World  •  Comments are off for this post
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30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World: The Fulani

May the Holy Spirit guide us as we pray for the largest nomadic people group in the world, the Fulani.

Although I have met several Fulani, I didn’t realize the numerical greatness of their people group.  Are you ready for their vastness?

There are 35,000,000 fabulous Fulani.  The African Sahel (the region between the Sahara and the Sudanian Savanna) is their home.

The Fulani men work as herdsmen, moving from place to place to provide the best food and water for their sheep, goats and cattle.  This work takes them away from their families and villages for nine or ten months a year.

At the same time, the Fulani women and children live and work in their villages.  Simply providing food and water requires most of their time and strength.

I have met two Christian missionaries (both with Ph.D degrees in cross-cultural disciplines) who lived with and among the Fulani for twenty-five years.  In twenty-five years of faithful nomadic life and ministry this ministry couple saw less than ten conversions to Christ.

“Lord, open the eyes of your fabulous Fulani people to see the salvation provided for them in birth, life, death, burial and resurrection of Jesus.”

May I recommend downloading the superb 30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World Prayer Guide?  Download link

Together, we are confident prayer

Posted on 6th May 2019 in 30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World  •  Comments are off for this post
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Commitment: Are Humans Trouble for God?

As we seek to become people of fully realized potential, we ask a most vital question, “Is God committed to me and to the realization of my fullest potential?”

 

From Heidi Reeder, author of Commit to Win: How to Harness the Four Elements of Commitment to Reach Your Goals, we understand her perspective of the scientific equation of commitment.

 

(Treasure – Troubles) + Contributions – Choices = Commitment

 

When we consider God’s relationship with us through the framework of Heidi Reeder’s commitment equation will we find that He is committed to us?

 

In a previous presentation we determined those who actively trust in Jesus for salvation are treasured by God.

 

I have loved you with an everlasting love; therefore I have continued my faithfulness to you.  Jeremiah 31:3

 

Now therefore, if you will indeed obey my voice and keep my covenant, you shall be my treasured possession among all peoples, for all the earth is mine.  Exodus 19:5

 

“For you are a people holy to the Lord your God. The Lord your God has chosen you to be a people for his treasured possession, out of all the peoples who are on the face of the earth.”  Deuteronomy 7:6

 

But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. 10 Once you were not a people, but now you are God’s people; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy.  1 Peter 2:9, 10

 

The commitment equation requires us to subtract from the treasure quotient the degree to which the entity is troublesome.

 

Therefore, in determining God’s commitment to me, it is urgent for me to consider:

 

  1. Are human beings trouble for God?
  2. If so, how does the trouble I cause Him impact His commitment to me?

 

Our Resurrection Sunday teaching highlighted “The Impossible Possibility” as a moniker for Jesus.  Being fully human and fully God, Jesus was both impossible and possible.

 

  • Man can’t be God, but Jesus is.
  • God can’t be human, but Jesus is.

 

In what we might call a Divine Paradox, opposites are both equally true in God.

 

“A paradox is a statement that, despite apparently valid reasoning from true premises, leads to an apparently-self-contradictory or logically unacceptable conclusion.  A paradox involves contradictory-yet-interrelated elements that exist simultaneously and persist over time.”  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox

 

True Premise One

 

God cannot be troubled.

 

True Premise Two

 

God is troubled by human beings.

 

Christians who are uncomfortable with paradox create ways to remove tension from the Biblical record.  In understanding today’s Old Testament text (Genesis 6:5-8), for example, their belief requires them to remove the tension created by the troubling of God by humans.

 

“The Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. 6 And the Lord regretted that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him to his heart. 7 So the Lord said, “I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the land, man and animals and creeping things and birds of the heavens, for I am sorry that I have made them.” 8 But Noah found favor in the eyes of the Lord.”

 

Notice what is happening in the heart of God in verse 6 and 7.

 

  1. The Lord regretted that he had made man on the earth,
  2. And it grieved him to his heart.
  3. For I am sorry that I have made them.

 

God’s response to “the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually” was “I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the land.”

 

God’s response is not in anger but from His heart of great compassion that was grieved and sorrowful.

 

The vengeance of God is the other side of His great compassion.

 

Since God is totally committed to His creation He must take action against that which destroys it.

 

Since God loves humanity, He must take action against that which destroys humanity.

 

In the Genesis flood, mankind experienced the other side of God’s compassion; His vengeance.

 

Humanity today is no better than the humanity of Noah’s day.  Their rebellion is our rebellion.  Their wickedness is our wickedness.

 

It is truly a paradox, an impossible possibility.  Although God cannot be troubled, you and I trouble the heart of God.

 

Notice the shift in the heart of God following the flood.  Genesis 8:21-22

 

And when the Lord smelled the pleasing aroma, the Lord said in his heart, “I will never again curse the ground because of man, for the intention of man’s heart is evil from his youth. Neither will I ever again strike down every living creature as I have done. 22 While the earth remains, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease.”

 

Walter Brueggemann states this change beautifully.

 

What has happened is a change wrought in the heart of God, who will no longer take vengeance.  The move in God’s heart from 6:5-7 to 8:21 suggests that instead of humankind suffering, God takes the suffering as “his” own.  God resolves to turn the grief in on “himself” rather than to rage against “his” creation.  God bears the vengeance of God in order that “his” creation can have compassion.  Praying the Psalms, page 77

 

Since my sin (like Noah’s generation) is troubling for God, how then will I experience the other side of God’s great compassion (vengeance)?

 

In what ways will I experience the anger of God?  The wrath of God?  The judgement of God?

 

Some people will argue, “God is love and He cannot be grieved, filled with sorrow or anger.  He never pours out wrath and judgement.”

 

Richard Niebuhr perceived this view in 1937.  “A God without wrath brought men without sin into a kingdom without judgment through the ministrations of a Christ without a cross.” The Kingdom of God in America, New York: Harper & Row, 1959 [1937], p. 193.

 

God’s great compassion and the other side of His compassion are the same yesterday, today and forever.  This isn’t a new day in which the God of the Old Testament somehow came to His senses and overcame a wrath problem.

 

Jesus’ death on the cross is the new flood.

 

The death of Jesus on the cross is the new ark.

 

I need not experience the vengeance and wrath of God because “Jesus, God’s son, took my place.”

 

On the cross God decisively demonstrated His great compassion for me.  Because He loves me, He destroyed that which would destroy me.

 

On the cross God decisively demonstrated the other side of His great compassion, His vengeance.  Because He loves me, He took His vengeance in upon Himself.

 

Notice the Bible’s revelation of the other side of God’s compassion for those who reject His provision on the cross.

 

Romans 1:18

For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth.

 

Romans 2:5

But because of your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed.

 

Romans 2:8

but for those who are self-seeking and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, there will be wrath and fury.

 

The Gospel is GOOD NEWS!  God is the Impossible Possibility.

 

On the cross He has given us His compassion and taken the other side of His compassion in upon Himself.

 

In trusting Jesus you and I are the recipients of God’s great compassion.

 

Romans 5:9

Since, therefore, we have now been justified by his blood, much more shall we be saved by him from the wrath of God.

 

1 Thessalonians 5:9

For God has not destined us for wrath, but to obtain salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ,

 

Am I trouble for God?  Yes, in every way.

 

Am I trouble for God?  No, He took my trouble and His response to my trouble in upon Himself.

 

God is committed to me.

 

God treasures me.

 

God’s Son became my trouble.

 

God’s Son contributed His all for me in receiving God’s vengeance and wrath for my trouble.

What must I “take in upon myself” so that my closest friends and my tribe receive God’s compassion through me?

 

My fullest potential is only realized when I place my trust in Jesus’ ministry on the cross and extend this same love and grace to others.  John 15:12, 13

My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you. 13 Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.

MCA LIFE GROUP HOME WORK

Listen – My Story

  • What is the most delightful recent addition to your life story?
  • In what ways did you access Heaven’s Gates and Hell’s Flames for your evangelism ministry?

Learn – Digging Deeper

  • How comfortable are you with Biblical revelation of God’s wrath, anger or judgement? Consider John 3:36
  • How comfortable are you with the Biblical revelation that in trusting Jesus for salvation He takes our place? Read Romans 5:6-11 and talk through the various things Jesus has done for us.

Lift – Prayer

  • How would you like your Life Group to pray for you today?
  • Is there someone you hope receives the wrath of God? Ask God to change your heart.  Pray for them.
  • Do you carry condemnation from something you have already confessed to God in repentance? Pray to trust God’s promise of removing His wrath.

Life – Taking it Home

  • What is the Holy Spirit asking you to add, delete or recalibrate in your life?
  • God’s commitment to you is costly beyond measure. To whom must you reflect costly commitment this week?

 

Posted on 4th May 2019 in Realized Potential, Uncategorized, Weekend Talks  •  Comments are off for this post
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Psalms: Windows and Mirrors

The Psalms:  Window and Mirrors

In the Psalter we have both windows and mirrors.

  • Through them we observe humans in interconnectivity with the Creator and His creation.
  • By them we see deeply into our own humanity.

Immersing ourselves in the Psalms we begin to ask, “Am I reading the Psalms or are the Psalms reading me?”

All the realities of human life are embraced in the Psalms.

To understand the Psalms, one must be interacting in real time with God, God’s creation, humans and the self.

The effectiveness of the Psalms is directly correlated to Biblical self-awareness.

Frederick Buechner accurately states, “The story of any one of us is in some measure the story of us all.”

“Listen to your life. See it for the fathomless mystery it is. In the boredom and pain of it, no less than in the excitement and gladness: touch, taste, smell your way to the holy and hidden heart of it, because in the last analysis all moments are key moments, and life itself is grace.”
― Frederick Buechner, Now and Then: A Memoir of Vocation

In listening to the lives of others and our own, we might see a synthesis of Paul Ricoeur’s work as presented by Walter Brueggemann.

“Our life of faith consists in moving with God in terms of:

  1. Being securely oriented;
  2. Being painfully disoriented; and
  3. Being surprisingly reoriented.”

Praying the Psalms, Walter Brueggemann, page 2

 

Being securely oriented Being painfully disoriented Being surprisingly reoriented
Psalms of Praise Psalms of Protest Psalms of Thanksgiving
Psalm 145 Psalm 22 Psalm 103

 

“But there are those (and this is our primary concern here) who have regular access to the psalms of high celebration but have been so numbed to their own experience that the words of the psalm have no counterpart in their own life experience.”  Praying the Psalms, Walter Brueggemann, page 2

The Psalter is a window into the orientation, disorientation and reorientation of others.

The Psalter is a mirror into the orientation, disorientation and reorientation of our selves.

Thus we shake off any and all numbness to our own lives and fully embrace our own psalms of praise, protest and thanksgiving.

Posted on 1st May 2019 in Psalms, Uncategorized, Wednesday Evenings  •  Comments are off for this post